International Journal of Current Research and Review (IJCRR)

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IJCRR - Vol 11 Issue 03, February

Pages: 01-05

Date of Publication: 07-Feb-2019


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Emotional Intelligence: A Analytical Study of Basketball Players

Author: Maman Paul

Category: Healthcare

Abstract:This study examined the emotional intelligence level among male basketball players. A group of fifty (N=50) male inter-college level basketball players of Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab were selected for this study. The purposive sampling technique was used to attain the objectives of the study. All the subjects, after having been informed about the objective and protocol of the study, gave their consent and volunteered to participate in this study. They were further divided into (N=10) each playing position i.e. Point guard (n1=10), Shooting guard (n2=10), Small forward (n3=10), Power forward (n4=10) and Center (n5=10). To measure the level of Emotional Intelligence of the subjects, the Emotional Intelligence Scale constructed by Hyde et al. (2001) was administered. One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was employed to find out the intra-group differences. Where F values were found significant, LSD (Least Significant Difference) Post-hoc test was applied to find out the direction and degree of difference. For testing the hypotheses, the level of significance was set at 0.05. Summarizing from the above findings we can say that insignificant differences were found among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) on the sub-variables of Emotional Intelligence.

Keywords: Emotional Intelligence, Basketball

DOI URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.31782/IJCRR.2019.11301

Full Text:

INTRODUCTION

Many scientific studies have been made on emotions and affections in recent years. More and more sports psychologists suggest that emotional intelligence could serve important role in different fields of sports. Research has shown psychological skills facilitate athletic performance. Relaxation training, positive thought control, self-regulation, imagery, concentration, energy control, self-monitoring, and goal setting are all traits that have been correlated with athletic performance (Zizzi, Deaner, & Hirschhorn, 2003). Many of these traits reflect emotional intelligence. These same traits have been correlated with work group cohesion, job performance, role conflict, and job satisfaction (Zizzi, Deaner, & Hirschhorn, 2003) Emotional intelligence includes distinguishing and controlling emotions in order to influence one's thoughts and behavior (Bradberry, Greaves, 1953). Emotional intelligence is an essential element of human behavior which acts independently and differently from cognitive intelligence (Bar-on, 2000). Emotional intelligence has its roots in Gardner’s interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence (Bar-on, 2000). The concept of emotional intelligence has provided a new insight into human intelligence and it represents the emotional, personal, and social dimensions of intelligence which are often more important for daily activities and interpersonal competitions than the conventional, cognitive dimensions of intelligence (Goleman, 1998). In order to prepare better players for this new century in sports, it might be better to include emotional intelligence in lives of players. Sports activity is integral to the all-round development of human personality. Sports bring pleasure due to emotional overtones and outward focus of attention in sports activities (Salovey & Mayer 1990). Emotional overtones of sports life removes boredom of daily routines and adds depths of feeling in coloured life. Outward focus of attention in sport brings not only well mental health but also emotional satisfaction (Sharma, 2016). Mayer and Salovey (2004) defined Emotional Intelligence as, “The capacity to reason with emotion in four areas to perceive emotion, to integrate it in thought, to understand it and to manage it. Petrides et al. (2004) suggested that people with high levels of emotional intelligence have a natural aptitude for emotional perception and can utilize this to move people to respond positively to them. Hein (2000) described emotional intelligence as knowing how to separate healthy feelings from unhealthy ones and how to turn negative feelings into positive ones. This study therefore investigated the applicability of emotional intelligence to male basketball players and further administered a programme of emotional intelligence on the athletes with a view to establishing its effectiveness or otherwise on their sports.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

SUBJECTS

To obtain data, the investigator had selected Fifty (N=50) male inter-college level basketball players of Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab were selected for this study. They were further divided into (N=10) each playing position i.e. Point guard (n1=10), Shooting guard (n2=10), Small forward (n3=10), Power forward (n4=10) and Center (n5=10).

TOOLS

  • To measure the level of Emotional Intelligence of the subjects, the Emotional Intelligence Scale constructed by Hyde et al. (2001) was administered.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was employed to find out the intra-group differences. Where F values were found significant, LSD (Least Significant Difference) Post-hoc test was applied to find out the direction and degree of difference. For testing the hypotheses, the level of significance was set at 0.05.

RESULTS

It can be seen from table-1 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Self-Awareness among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .365 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be ascertained from table-2 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Empathy among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .783 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It is evident from table-3 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Self-Motivation among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .527 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be observed from table-4 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Emotional Stability among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .322 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be seen from table-5 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Managing Relations among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .045 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

The results of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) in table-6 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Integrity among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .234 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be seen from table-7 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Self-Development among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .877 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

The results of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) in table-8 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Value Orientation among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .890 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be seen from table-9 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Commitment among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .577 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be seen from table-10 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the sub-parameter Altruistic Behaviour among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .788 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

It can be seen from table-11 that insignificant differences were found with regard to the parameter Emotional Intelligence among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) as the P-value (Sig.) .890 was found higher than the 0.05 level of significance (p>0.05). Since F-value was found insignificant, therefore, there is no need to apply Post-hoc test.

CONCLUSION

Summarizing from the above findings we can say that insignificant differences were found among basketball players (Point Guard, Shooting Guard, Small Forward, Power Forward and Center) on the sub-variables of Emotional Intelligence.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION

The study will be considerably helpful to comprehend the Emotional Intelligence level existing among male basketball players. The sports psychologists and coaches working with these areas will drive benefit from the findings of the present research and they can integrate Emotional Intelligence variables in their training schedule from the very initial stages.

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